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How Much is Alimony in Nevada?

How much is alimony in Nevada? 

Various factors determine this.

Alimony is money one spouse pays the other when they get divorced. This money often gets awarded to the spouse that makes the least money.

In Nevada, a judge has the right to determine alimony payments during a divorce hearing. 

Several factors help determine who gets maintenance and for how much money.

Read on to learn how much alimony costs and how it gets determined in Nevada.

alimony

What Types of Alimony Exist in Nevada?

Four types of divorce exist in Nevada. 

 They include:

  1. Temporary. If a spouse is dependent on the other, they might get granted support.

  2. Short-term. This type of alimony gets granted for a set period. This support often ends after a particular event. For instance, a spouse may need maintenance for a year to adjust to a post-divorce lifestyle.

  3. Permanent. While less common, this type of payment is for people who were in long-term marriages. This alimony occurs when one spouse is dependent on the other for money.
  4. Rehabilitative. The court wants to ensure that both spouses are on an equal footing. So, alimony may get granted if: 
  • One spouse obtained job skills or training during the marriage
  • One spouse gave monetary support to the other while gaining an education or training.

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What Determines Who Gets Alimony?

So what qualifies a spouse for alimony?

There are a few factors that determine who gets alimony in a divorce. Several things get considered when the court decides who gets maintenance.

How long does your marriage have to be for you or your spouse to get alimony?

The length of the marriage is the first factor.

Generally, a couple’s marriage must last between three and twenty years. Any time less than that may not qualify you for alimony.

The alimony payment period is usually half, or even forty percent, of the time of the marriage. For instance, if your marriage lasted ten years, you or your spouse may be eligible for alimony for four to five years.

Permanent alimony is possible if your marriage lasts for longer than twenty years.

Was your marriage short-term?

If so, was your and your spouse a massive difference in income?

In that case, one partner may get awarded short-term alimony until they make up the lost income.

If a wife makes much more than her spouse, she may be responsible for alimony payments. In bygone eras, the husband usually paid the wife alimony. But, as more women are active in the workforce, this is not always the case.

When Does the Judge Determine Alimony is Due?

Alimony does not consistently get awarded in a court decision. These factors consider:

When there is a disparity in income

When the couple’s marriage or domestic partnership lasted for an extended period

When a spouse needs financial support due to a health issue

When a spouse needs retraining to get back into the workforce

These factors help a judge determine if one spouse is eligible for alimony payments. Your attorney can help you decide if you may qualify for alimony or if you may owe your spouse alimony.

Nevada is a no-fault state.

That means a spouse’s wrongdoing does not mean their partner is eligible for alimony. If their actions caused economic harm, a judge might grant temporary spousal support. The same is true if one of the spouses needs immediate financial help.

What Determines How Much Alimony Costs?

How much is alimony? A few factors can help a judge determine how much one spouse pays the other.

Other considerations when determining alimony include:

  • The standard of living in which both spouses are used to living
  • The career of both spouses before the marriage
  • Whether one spouse has increased the career of the other spouse
  • Age and education of both parties
  • The paying spouse’s ability to pay alimony

While Nevada does not have an alimony formula, this can give you an idea of how much alimony will cost. A skilled Las Vegas divorce attorney will help ensure you get the best result for your alimony payment.

Seek Legal Advice

How much is alimony in Nevada?

It is a complicated question that depends on several factors.

Depending on which side of the divorce you are on, you will want to get as much money as possible to support yourself.

If the shoe is on the other foot, you don’t want to pay so much alimony it causes hardship to yourself.

Our family law team at Rosenblum Law Firm is ready to help you. We can help you navigate the legal process and get a satisfactory result for your divorce.

Get an experienced divorce lawyer with our firm now by calling us at (702) 433-2889. You can also fill out our online form for more information.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What if my spouse and I have a prenuptial agreement?

A prenuptial agreement is a contract signed before marriage that outlines things like asset division and alimony if the couple gets divorced. Prenuptial agreements are legally binding in Nevada, so they can impact who is eligible for alimony and how much. The court will take the prenup into consideration when determining alimony.

What if my spouse cheated?

Since Nevada is a no-fault divorce state, a spouse’s adultery does not affect alimony eligibility or amounts. The only exceptions are if the cheating caused economic harm or if temporary support is needed immediately. Otherwise, adultery has no direct bearing on alimony determinations.

How are retirement accounts divided?

Retirement accounts like 401(k)s and pensions are considered marital property in Nevada and will be equitably divided during divorce. This may impact the total assets each spouse has available, which could influence alimony needs and amounts. How retirement accounts get split depends on factors like account balances and ages of the spouses.

Can alimony be modified later?

Yes, alimony orders can be modified after the divorce if there is a substantial change in circumstances. For instance, alimony may be reduced if the receiving spouse begins earning more. Or it could increase if the paying spouse gets a significant raise. To modify alimony, you must file a motion with the court.

How quickly does my spouse have to begin paying?

Court orders mandating alimony payments usually begin immediately after the divorce decree is issued. However, payment details like due dates and methods may be outlined separately. An attorney can advise you on ensuring alimony gets paid promptly per the court’s orders.

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Glossary

Alimony – Financial support paid by one spouse to the other during or after a divorce. Also called spousal support or maintenance.

No-fault divorce – A divorce in which the dissolution of a marriage does not require alleging fault or wrongdoing by either spouse. Nevada has no-fault divorce.

Marital property – Assets acquired during the marriage that are considered jointly owned by both spouses. These are divided equitably during divorce.

Divorce decree – The final court judgement dissolving a marriage. It outlines things like asset division, alimony, child custody.

Modification – The process of filing a motion to change the terms of a divorce decree, such as altering alimony or child support. Requires substantial change in circumstances.

Equitable division – The fair splitting of marital assets and debts during divorce. It does not always mean an exactly equal 50/50 division.

Domestic partnership – An unmarried couple living together and sharing a domestic life. Nevada treats these similar to marriages for alimony purposes.

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Additional Resources for You

Our lead attorney, Molly Rosenblum Allen, Esq., has meticulously crafted a suite of resources to guide and support you during challenging times. We encourage our readers to leverage these invaluable resources:

  1. Las Vegas Divorce Attorney: Expert legal advice and support tailored for divorce cases in Las Vegas. Explore More

  2. Alimony in Nevada: Navigate the complexities of alimony in Nevada with this comprehensive guide. Learn More

  3. Divorce and Mortgage: Understand the implications of divorce on your mortgage and property ownership. Get Informed

  4. Divorce and Taxes: Find out how divorce can impact your tax situation and what steps you can take to manage it effectively. Know Your Taxes

  5. Health Insurance After Divorce: Essential information on how to handle health insurance coverage after a divorce. Stay Covered

  6. Divorce and Bankruptcy: A guide to understanding the interplay between divorce proceedings and bankruptcy. Navigate Financially

  7. Student Loan Debt Divorce: Learn how student loan debts are treated and divided in the event of a divorce. Manage Your Loans

  8. Divorce Attorney Fee: Get clarity on the costs involved in hiring a divorce attorney and planning your budget accordingly. Understand the Costs

  9. Who Gets the House in a Divorce in Nevada: Insightful information on property division, specifically concerning real estate in Nevada divorce cases. Learn Property Rights

  10. How to Not Get Screwed in a Divorce: Strategic advice to protect your rights and assets during a divorce. Protect Your Interests

Molly Rosenblum Allen, Esq. is dedicated to providing professional, empathetic, and effective assistance through every phase of these often challenging times. Use these resources to empower yourself with knowledge and navigate your situation with confidence.

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Offsite Resources You May Find Helpful

Here are seven offsite resources that provide information about alimony in Nevada:

  1. Nevada State Bar: The official site of the Nevada State Bar, providing resources about various legal topics including alimony.

  2. FindLaw: This online resource provides free legal information, a lawyer directory, and other resources on a wide range of legal topics, including alimony laws in Nevada.

  3. Justia: A platform that provides free legal information and a directory of attorneys for various legal issues, including alimony.

  4. Avvo: This website provides a directory of lawyers, legal advice, and other resources on a broad range of legal topics, including alimony.

  5. American Bar Association: The ABA provides a variety of resources on legal topics, including information on alimony.

  6. LegalMatch: This online legal matching service helps individuals find lawyers in their area, including divorce attorneys in Nevada who can provide guidance on alimony.

  7. Nolo: This website provides legal information to consumers and small businesses, including articles, blogs, FAQs, and news on family law and alimony.

Why You Haven't Hired an Alimony Attorney Yet

There’s a very good reason why you haven’t hired an alimony attorney yet if you need one. We’re ready to help you. Watch this short video to find out how we’re going to do it.

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A Special Message from Our Lead Attorney

Headshot of Molly Rosenblum Allen, attorney at law, with long blond hair and wearing a black blazer. Molly Rosenblum Allen is the founder and managing attorney of Rosenblum Allen Law.

Molly Rosenblum, Esq

I hope this message finds you well.

Thank you for your time and interest in reading our resources on “How Much is Alimony in Nevada?”.

We understand that such topics can be complex and emotionally charged, and we commend your initiative in seeking information to understand your situation better.

My team and I at The Rosenblum Allen Law Firm have a wealth of experience navigating the intricacies of alimony laws in Nevada.

We are fully committed to providing you with the legal guidance, support, and representation you need during this challenging time.

If you’re ready to take the next step, I invite you to call me at (702) 433-2889.

We can discuss your situation and determine the best course of action tailored to your needs.

Please understand that every situation is unique and that the information provided in our resources serves as a general guide.

The best way to know how the laws apply to your specific situation is through a personal discussion.

While we do not offer free consultations, we assure you that your investment with us will be worthwhile.

We prioritize your best interests and work diligently to ensure you receive the fairest and most equitable outcome possible.

I look forward to your call and thank you again for considering us as your trusted legal partner in this journey.

Best regards,
Molly

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